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We did it! Microsoft Inspire Twitter Party and more #MSInspire #MSInspireDev

Posted by DeeDee Walsh on Jul, 19, 2018 @ 15:07

Another great Microsoft event in the bag. This week Richard Campbell (of ".NET Rocks!" fame), Sara Faatz of Progress Software and I headed to Las Vegas to hang out with 14K other Microsoft partners and to host a developer-focused Twitter party. Check out Richard Campbell's Twitter feed to see all of the posts - lots of great technical content plus we shot some great video as well. Companies like Docker, GrapeCity, Infragistics, LEADTOOLS, Syncfusion, Progress and many more contributed content and prizes. If you didn't attend Inspire, check out my favorite developer session "DevOps on Azure: loved by developers, trusted by the enterprise". There's some great stuff on open source investments, customer insights and partner opportunity. 

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Topics: .NET, Web Application Development, developers, #Inspire, Twitter, desktop apps

WebMAP: changing the Kendo theme

Posted by John Browne on Jun, 21, 2018 @ 13:06

In our last blog post, we looked at how to change the styling of individual elements in our migrated Angular application. Just a reminder in case you haven't been following along, this is a simple hello world app migrated from Windows Forms to HTML and ASP.NET Core with WebMAP5.

Find the selector, edit the css file, and rebuild it. You can change the global styles.css file or individual css files for each component.

Or, as we will show in this post, you can change the whole kit and caboodle.

Progress Kendo UI has a full set of web components for Angular. And it happens to be our reference implementation for WebMAP

Kendo UI has three themes that are available: the default theme, which is what we implemented, a Bootstrap theme, and a material theme. Today we'll take our little hello world app and switch it to the hyper-cool material theme.

To set the stage, here's what our hello world app looks like using the default Kendo theme (which is the WebMAP default):


It's not bad, but there's room for improvement. Let's get busy.

Installing the Kendo UI material theme

Th is is easy-peasy. Open up the angular folder in Visual Studio Code, get a terminal, and install using NPM:

npm install --save @progress/kendo-theme-material

Once the theme has been installed, you can verify it by looking in node_modules\@progress\kendo-theme-material\dist where you should find the all.css file, a minified version of the styling for the theme. If you want to see what the theme does, the Kendo UI documentation has great examples.

Ok, all we have to do now is include the theme in our app and rebuild it. 

In our .angular-cli.json file we need to change the styles from kendo-theme-default to kendo-theme-material, like so:

All that remains is to execute an ng build command in the terminal and the front end code will be changed to the new theme. 

Here's our app running in material theme:

Themes are a great way to jumpstart a complete re-do of the look and feel of an app. And, of course, you can always go into the global styles or individual component styles to override something you want to change. We covered that recently. And of course, having done this for our "hello world" applet, I wanted to try it on our more red-blooded demo app--Salmon King Seafood. Here's a quick screen shot of the opening form with the material theme applied:

I had to tweak some styles a bit because not all the fonts looked great. Somehow we lost our background color, but that would also be an easy fix. We do get the coolness of the 3D buttons and form fields, so this is a nice upgrade. It's also a nice reminder of how easy it is to upgrade the look and feel of an app once it's correctly architected for the web.

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Topics: Web Application Development, WebMAP

WebMAP app architecture part 3

Posted by John Browne on Jun, 06, 2018 @ 13:06

Before we jump into the last installment, let's briefly review what we leaned in part 1 and part 2. If you're just jumping into this here, you probably want to go back to the beginning and read from there.

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Topics: Web Application Development, WebMAP

Best Mobilize.Net Blog Posts of 2017

Posted by DeeDee Walsh on Jan, 18, 2018 @ 20:01

2017 was a great year for malware, security breaches, billion dollar company valuations and cryptocurrencies, amirite? Over here at Mobilize, we had a great year of modernizing a lot of code, meeting with lots of developers and writing about all of it. ICYMI, we've pulled together a round-up of our favorite blog posts from 2017. Here goes...

 black hat guy.jpg

What can we learn from Equifax?

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Topics: application modernization, Windows security, Web Application Development, code transformation, modernization ROI, Mobile security, ransomware, Web Development, DevOps, PreEmptive Solutions, #gdpr, Dotfuscator, application modernization, WebMAP, Syncfusion, developer productivity

True cost of rewriting software: some reflections

Posted by John Browne on Dec, 20, 2017 @ 11:12

We have a calculator. I made it.

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Topics: software development, Web Application Development, developer productivity

VB6 to Web: an ISV's journey

Posted by John Browne on Mar, 23, 2017 @ 17:03

Today I watched a demo of an app we are finishing up--this belongs to an ISV who serves a vertical market and like a lot of those kinds of apps it sort of does everything for the customer. We are going to have a full case study on this soon but it was such a great story that I wanted to share immediately.

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Topics: application modernization, Web Application Development, WebMAP

WebMAP app architecture part 2

Posted by John Browne on May, 12, 2016 @ 10:05

In the first part of this series, we spent some time discussing how complex web application coding can be. Web sites are simple; web apps are hard. 

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Topics: convert Windows to Web, Web Application Development, WebMAP, ASP.NET/MVC

C# to HTML5: save on deployment costs

Posted by John Browne on Mar, 02, 2016 @ 16:03

The last big company I worked at (Microsoft) had a LOT of desktops (as you can well imagine). And of course they also had a lot of internal apps that employees had to use, whether for performance reviews, source control, expense reports--you name it. 

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Topics: application modernization, Web Application Development, C# to HTML

PowerBuilder to Java/HTML5 Modernization

Posted by John Browne on Oct, 20, 2015 @ 10:10

The PowerBuilder to Java/HTML5 Migration is the leading way for migrating legacy PowerBuilder code to the Java framework and the most modern HTML5 portable UI. Our automated migration technology has migrated billions of lines of code, and is used by hundreds of thousands of developers.

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Topics: HTML5, Web Application Development, PowerBuilder, JavaScript

C# to HTML (or Windows vs the Web) Part 1

Posted by John Browne on Sep, 30, 2015 @ 12:09

If you’re used to developing for Windows (or MacOS or Linux or really any desktop OS) and you are contemplating a Web version of your application, there are a variety of things to consider. Moving from C# to HTML is more than just learning some different syntax and related frameworks. It's a whole new world.

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Topics: convert Windows to Web, C#, Web Application Development, WebMAP2