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John Browne

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Visual Studio 2019 is here!

Posted by John Browne on Apr, 02, 2019 @ 06:04

 Launch day! At least it is in Redmond where the Visual Studio team is celebrating the launch of VS 2019, and no, it's not an April Fools joke (that was yesterday).

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Topics: Visual Studio, developer productivity

Migrating PowerBuilder DataWindows to web (part 3)

Posted by John Browne on Mar, 11, 2019 @ 11:03

Welcome back. If you've been reading along, in Part 1 and Part 2 we talked about what PowerBuilder DataWindows do, how they are used, and the challenges of modernizing PowerBuilder DataWindows to native web apps.

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Topics: application modernization, PowerBuilder, Web Development

Migrating PowerBuilder DataWindows to Web (Part 2)

Posted by John Browne on Mar, 04, 2019 @ 14:03

In Part 1, we reviewed the nature and popularity of PowerBuilder DataWindows, and yes PowerBuilder was pretty cool back in the day. But so were leisure suits. Now, however, nobody is birthing new PowerBuilder developers so it makes sense to get off it. And since the core of a PowerBuilder app is lots of DataWindows, I want to show how WebMAP can migrate PowerBuilder DataWindows to a modern web app.

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Topics: Web Application Development, PowerBuilder

Migrating PowerBuilder DataWindows to Web

Posted by John Browne on Mar, 04, 2019 @ 14:03

The DataWindow object is the cornerstone of PowerBuilder application development. PowerBuilder apps are largely designed around accessing databases, typically for CRUD (Create, Read, Update, Delete) operations. In fact, most business applications--especially legacy client/server applications--are forms over data: screens contain a host of data-bound controls designed to build queries against database tables, return results, and allow for CRUD updates.

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Topics: Web Application Development, PowerBuilder

Should you modify a VB6 app while migrating to .NET?

Posted by John Browne on Dec, 19, 2018 @ 15:12

Recently one of our account executives asked me an interesting question. He had been contacted by an ISV who was slogging through a rewrite of a very large (millions of lines of code) VB6 app to .NET. And like many if not most companies who attempt rewrites of very large applications, at some point the pain, cost, time, and risk began to be largely untenable and they began investigating tools to address the problem. 

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Topics: application modernization, desktop apps

VB6 to Docker Part 4

Posted by John Browne on Nov, 29, 2018 @ 06:11

Almost done.

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Topics: containers, Docker

VB6 to Docker Part 3

Posted by John Browne on Nov, 29, 2018 @ 06:11

(Note: this is the part 3 in a four part series--if you're just starting here I would urge you to go back to Part 1 and 2 and read them first.

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Topics: webapps, containers, Docker

VB6 to Docker Part 2

Posted by John Browne on Nov, 29, 2018 @ 06:11

Note: this is part 2 of a four part series. If you stumbled in here from the street, here's part 1 to help get you oriented. 

If you want to follow along, you can download the code here.

What's Docker?

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Topics: webapps, containers, Docker

VB6 to docker

Posted by John Browne on Nov, 29, 2018 @ 06:11

Extinction is normal

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Topics: webapps, containers, Docker

Visual Studio Extensions, DevIntersection, #MSFTConnect();, and #CodeParty will all rock your world

Posted by John Browne on Nov, 19, 2018 @ 14:11

Recently at a Microsoft event, I heard that there are still over two million desktop application developers--that is, currently writing or maintaining Windows desktop apps, whether written in C++ or .NET. And regardless of your tool lashup--be it Winforms and C#, or WPF or UWP, Visual Studio is the IDE of choice. (VS Code is great, it's awesome, I use it myself--just not for pure Windows desktop development. For that I want the full meal deal.)

And one of the things that makes VS2017 such an amazing IDE is its extensibility, which has allowed an entire vast ecosystem of add-ins to flourish. You can find them in the Visual Studio Marketplace, or by searching from inside VS: Just go to Tools.Extensions and Updates... and select the "Online" option:

You may not remember the days before there were add-ins, but let me tell you they were bleak. Nowadays, if you have a specific need for functionality, there's a nearly 100% chance that someone else has the same need and has written an add-in that more than adequately addresses what you might want to do. In fact, here at Mobilize, we're big geeks and are always looking for ways to make our developers more productive. In the spirit of sharing (and Thanksgiving, right?!) here are some of my favorite tools for making your programming more productive:

Progress

The creator of Telerik .NET and Kendo UI JavaScript user interface components/controls, reporting solutions and productivity tools, Progress offers all the tools developers need to build high-performant modern web, mobile, and desktop apps with outstanding UI. In addition to tools for creating web, mobile and desktop apps efficiently, Progress also enables developers to create modern chatbot experiences in their apps.

LEADTOOLS

LEADTOOLS Imaging SDKs help programmers integrate A-Z imaging into their cross-platform applications. The comprehensive toolkits offer powerful features including OCR, Barcode, Forms, PDF, Document Viewing, Image Processing, DICOM, and PACS. Whether you're building an Enterprise Content Management (ECM) solution, zero-footprint medical viewer, or audio/video media streaming server, LEADTOOLS has something for every developer with native libraries for .NET, Apple, Android, and Linux, as well as a newly released consumption-based Web API in LEADTOOLS Cloud Services.

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Topics: developers